Seminars & Events

The Research Department regularly organises research seminars, symposia, and other events. Please find information on the current seminar series and other forthcoming events below.

Research Seminars and Events

Research Seminars usually take place on occasional Wednesdays from 17.15h-18.15h with venues alternating between the Dance and Music Faculties. 

All welcome!

Below is an outline of the 2015-16 Trinity Laban Research Hub events, including Research Seminars. 


Tue 15 Sep 2015
Graduate School Symposium on Research Methodologies
Faculty of Dance, 10.00h-16.00h
Speakers: Jonathan Clark; Zoi Dimitriou; Sam Hayden; Dominic Murcott; Sue Akroyd; Sophie Fuller 
Alumni Panel: Anne Verhaeghe; Chi-Ling Lok; Olga Masleinnikova; Jillian Bain Christie (in conversation with Jonathan Clark)

Open to Trinity Laban staff and students only.

 

Tue 27 Oct 2015
Research-Informed Teaching Event
Faculty of Dance, Studios 5 and 7, 14.00h-15.30
Showcasing research-informed teaching within the faculties
Examples of: Work in progress; Peer review/literature review; Research project in train; Publications; CD/Video.
Facilitated by Louise Jackson and Jonathan Clark

Open to Trinity Laban staff only.

 

Mon 2 Nov 2015
Foundations for Excellence Conference 2015
Meeting the Challenges of Excellence in Music and Dance
Faculty of Dance, 10.30-20.00
The conference aims to challenge existing pedagogical practices and propose innovative methods of nurturing excellence among young dancers and musicians.
Please find detailed information here.

 

Tue 10 Nov 2015
First in 'CREATIVE CONVERSATIONS' Series
Lizzi Kew Ross (Trinity Laban), Douglas Finch (Trinity Laban) and Jon Sanders (film maker)
Faculty of Music, Stuart Room, 18.00-19.00

This new series explores the nature of collaborative relationships, comprising of three interviews by Lizzi Kew Ross with choreographers, musicians, a film maker and a lighting designer; considering what makes them successful, the demands and shared interests, the specific dynamics and conversations that are important to each pair of artists.

Director Jon Sanders and composer Douglas Finch have collaborated on five feature films over the last fifteen years – the most recent shot in the French Pyrenees this past September and due to be released next year. Jon Sanders’ critically acclaimed films are delicate and evocative portrayals of the fragility of everyday lives, and are influenced by such models as Bresson, Tarkovsky, Mizoguchi and Fellini. Having begun his career in film as a sound designer, Jon Sanders takes great care over the music – both in terms of aesthetic and in relation to natural sound. Douglas’ close working relationship with Jon involves experimentation and improvisation in the early devising stages, performing music live on set in improvised scenes, and the employment of a very spare but highly exposed musical score in post production. Lizzi Kew-Ross, in her interview, will explore the workings of this remarkable collaborative process from the exploration of conceptual models through to devising, recording, editing and mixing. The interview will be illustrated by extracts from the films which include Painted Angels (1999), Low Tide (2008), Late September (2009), Back to the Garden (2013) and Harvest (working title, in post production).

Open to the public.

 

Wed 18 Nov 2015
Practice-as-Research Reading Group
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.00
Led by John Irving
Text: Chapter 5 (on "Representation") from Nick Cook's Music: A Very Short Introduction 

Open to Trinity Laban staff and students only.

 

Wed 25 Nov 2015
Research Professional Development Series
Preparing For Your Upgrade (facilitator Jonathan Clark)
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.00-16.00

Open to Trinity Laban research students only.
Further details from the Research Administrator a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk

 

Wed 25 Nov 2015
RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES and Book Launch
Vicky Hunter (Chichester); Rachel Sara (UWE); Alice Sara (Trinity Laban)
Faculty of Dance, Lecture Theatre, 17.15 -18.15
Followed by drinks in the Laban Bar - all welcome!

Book launch and seminar for new Routledge volume on site-specific dance: Moving Sites

Moving Sites explores site-specific dance practice through a combination of analytical essays and practitioner accounts of their working processes. In offering this joint effort of theory and practice, it aims to provide dance academics, students and practitioners with a series of discussions that shed light both on approaches to making this type of dance practice, and evaluating and reflecting on it. The edited volume combines critical thinking from a range of perspectives including commentary and observation from the fields of dance studies, human geography and spatial theory in order to present interdisciplinary discourse and a range of critical and practice-led lenses through which this type of work can be considered and explored. In so doing, this book addresses the following questions:

  • How do choreographers make site-specific dance performance?
  • What occurs when a moving body engages with site, place and environment?
  • How might we interpret, analyse and evaluate this type of dance practice through a range of theoretical lenses?
  • How can this type of practice inform wider discussions of embodiment, site, space, place and environment?

This innovative and exciting book seeks to move beyond description and discussion of site-specific dance as a spectacle or novelty and considers site-dance as a valid and vital form of contemporary dance practice that explores, reflects, disrupts, contests and develops understandings and practices of inhabiting and engaging with a range of sites and environments.

Open to the public.

 

Wed 2 Dec 2015
RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES
Zoi Dimitriou (Trinity Laban)
Faculty of Dance, Studio 5, 17.15-19.15
Followed by drinks in the Laban Bar - all welcome!

The Chapter House

The research seminar will focus around my latest work The Chapter House (2014), an interdisciplinary dance piece with intricate choreography and live video documentation/installation by inventor of the Isadora software and co-director of Troika Ranch, Mark Coniglio.

I intend to use experts from this work to further discuss notions of live documentation in performance through digital media and the body as a living archive and site of discourse open to shifting angles of gaze and interpretation. This presentation will be responding to questions around how documentation can be a source for inspiration and creation of new work and unpick notions of newness and the value of commemorating what is by nature ephemeral.

Workshop: ‘Performing Documents’

Following the research seminar there will be a workshop called ‘Performing Documents’ open to all (you do not have to be a dance practitioner), which will be looking at documentation as practice through a physical exploration. Participants are encouraged to bring cameras, i-phones, notebooks and any other devices that can be used for documentation.

Open to the public.

 

Thu 10 Dec 2015
Trinity Laban at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London
Parallax 06

Led by Sam Hayden

The Trinity Laban Research and Composition Departments will showcase an evening of new and recent work by current TL RDP and PG students and TL staff, at the ICA, London on Thursday 10 December 2015. The title of the event is 'Moving Sound: The Performer In Space', and will be the 6th in the Parallax series of performances at Trinity Laban. 'Moving Sound' will also be part of a week long festival commencing December 7-11 2015 at TL, including the Rude Health performances, featuring diverse contemporary work by TL students and staff.

'Moving Sound' will feature multi-disciplinary artistic practice taking place at TL in a single evening event. These can include composition, dance, visual arts, multi-media or other interdisciplinary practice.

Open to the public.

 

Wed 27 Jan 2016
RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES
Lizzi Kew Ross (Trinity Laban)
Faculty of Dance, Lecture Theatre, 17.15-18.15
Followed by drinks in the Laban Bar - all welcome!

Choreographic practice and the nature of the poetic image

An exploration into the nature of the poetic image and a view of choreographic practice.

This will bring together personal and ‘constellation- like’ examples from a number of art forms, exploring the nature of the ‘poetic’. Drawing from the writings of Berger, Benjamin and Pallasmaa, the films of Tarkovsky and Donnersmarck, the artists Burri, Rothko and Frost, and the poets Brooke and Maxwell, it will explore critical thinking and influences that the poetic image can bring into choreographic research and practice.

Open to the public.

 

Wed 10 Feb 2016
Research Professional Development Series
Thesis Formatting and Viva-Voce Examination Preparation (facilitator John Irving)
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.00-16.00

Open to Trinity Laban research students only.
Further details from the Research Administrator a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk

 

Wed 17 Feb 2016
Practice-as-Research Reading Group
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.00
Jonathan Clark on critical approaches to Practice as Research- text: John Croft ("Composition is not Research" in Tempo)

Open to Trinity Laban staff and students only.

 

Wed 2 March 2016
Research Professional Development Series
Writing for and Submitting to Academic Journals (facilitator Jonathan Clark)
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.00-16.00

Open to Trinity Laban staff and research students only.
Further details from the Research Administrator a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk

 

Wed 2 March 2016
RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES
Ann van Allen-Russell (Trinity Laban)
Faculty of Music, Peacock Room, 17.15-18.15

'Labours of the mind’: Bach, Abel and the emergence of musical intellectual property in eighteenth-century England

When legal issues related to music are discussed, scholars generally consider a single legal case and its distinct but localized impact on a specific event or action such as copyright infringement, bankruptcy or theft. Rarely has an array of legal cases been the focus of research in order to explore how those in the music profession, specifically composers and publishers, employed them to reorganize the law to acknowledge intangible works such as music as property and thus gain some form of clearly defined protection under the law.

This seminar explores a set of three lawsuits brought by two of eighteenth-century London’s most well-known composers – Johann Christian Bach and Carl Fredrick Abel. The three suits were filed in quick succession – within a few months to several weeks of each other – against the same publishers, James Longman and Charles Lukey. The two suits filed by J. C. Bach have been the subject of previous work but only as individual cases revealing the struggle to prevent unauthorized publishing and selling of compositions; the Abel suit has never been studied in much detail. When, however, these three suits are considered collectively it raises three deceptively simple questions:

1) Were these two composers attempting to clarify and re-shape English law to grant property status to ‘mental labour’, extending the argument beyond protection of the physical manuscript as a form of property to the very ideas themselves (‘intangible expression’) applying the literary arguments to musical compositions?

2) How did this change happen?

3) Do these suits point to the emergence of the concept of musical intellectual property?

By approaching these lawsuits collectively rather than singly, we can chart the evolution of approach amongst the Bach and Abel Chancery suits in seeking relief from the predation of unscrupulous publishers, from the mere pursuit of compensation to resolving the fundamental legal principle of ownership of both the physical property and the ‘labour of the mind’. By this approach we can consider the intersection of the legal and the musical in a new and different way.

Open to the public.

 

Wed 9 March 2016
Research Professional Development Series
Conferences: How to Choose, How to Submit (facilitators Emma Redding and Sophie Fuller)
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.00-16.00

Open to Trinity Laban staff and research students only.
Further details from the Research Administrator a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk

 

Wed 16 March 2016
Practice-as-Research Reading Group
Faculty of Music, Room 242, 15.30
Jonathan Clark on critical approaches to Practice as Research- text: John Croft ("Composition is not Research" in Tempo)

Open to Trinity Laban staff and students only.

 

Wed 16 Mar 2016
RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES
Dominic Murcott (Trinity Laban)
Faculty of Music, Peacock Room, 17.15-18.15

Reliving a Crisis: Cunningham and Nancarrow 1960 and 2015

In 1960 the Merce Cunningham Dance Company used the superhuman player piano music of Conlon Nancarrow in the piece Crises (with costumes by Robert Rauschenberg). The highly dramatic work was described by Cunningham as ‘an adventure in togetherness’ and contributed to Nancarrow’s work becoming internationally known. With only a poor quality recording of the original edit surviving, I was asked in 2015 by the Cunningham Trust to create a new recording using an identical player piano to Nancarrow’s. This talk will uncover the bizarre process of recreating the soundtrack and invite the audience to get up close to the player piano and hear the pieces the way Nancarrow did. It will also examine some of the exceptional qualities of the Cunningham/Nancarrow work using archive footage.

Open to the public.

 

Mon 21 to Thu 24 March 2016
Research Degree Programme Week
A week of research student presentations and other research sessions (see the listed Research Seminars and Research PD sessions) at venues across the Dance and Music Faculties.
Find programme updates here .

 

Tue 22 Mar 2016
RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES
Erin-Johnson Williams (Trinity Laban)
Faculty of Music, Theatre Studio, 17.15-18.15

Visualising Evangelism through Musical Notation: the Tonic Sol-fa Movement in the Victorian World

For nineteenth-century British missionaries, music was often employed as a ‘tool of control for evangelism and civilization’ (Charles McGuire, Music and Victorian Philanthropy [2009]). Indeed, the use of hymn-singing as a medium for communal bonding and as a means of enhancing if not accelerating the process of conversion to Christianity, has been well established. Yet the relatively elapsed pedagogical tool employed by many Victorian-era missionaries and singing school teachers that has hitherto received less scholarly attention was the alternative notational system ‘of the lower classes’ known as the Tonic Sol-fa method. First invented by Sarah Glover (1785-1867), and made into an unprecedentedly lucrative music publishing venture in the later nineteenth century by John Curwen (1816-1880) and his son John Spencer Curwen (1847-1916), the Tonic Sol-fa system resonated with missionaries in particular because the Curwens emphasized its accessibility to musically illiterate converts by replacing standard staff notation with simple alphabetical letters representing solfege scale degrees. Additionally, the low reproduction costs of a visually simpler notation system enabled the cheap mass-production of hymnals. However, the accessibility of Tonic Sol-fa notation was also a means of musical limitation, especially as Tonic Sol-fa singing schools in colonial outposts such as nineteenth-century South Africa became increasingly associated with ‘black’ worship, and singing from ‘elite’, ‘white’, and what became constructed as the ‘secular’ alternative of standard staff notation became progressively more politicized. This paper draws upon archival material from Cape Town, South Africa, as well as Victorian newspapers to contextualize theological representations of race through Victorian missionary singing schools.

Open to the public.

 

Wed 23 March 2016
Research Professional Development Series
Academic Jobs and Academic Job Interviews (facilitator Sam Hayden)
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.00-16.00
Open to Trinity Laban research students only.
Further details from the Research Administrator a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk

 

Wed 20 April
Research Professional Development Series
Navigating Peer Review (facilitators Louise Jackson and Jonathan Clark)
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 15.30-16.30
Open to Trinity Laban staff and research students only.
Further details from the Research Administrator a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk

 

Thu 21 April 2016
Research Lab Graduate School Symposium: Practice-as-Research Methodologies
Faculty of Dance, 16.00-19.00
Keynote speakers: Wayne McGregor (Trinity Laban) and  Mine Dagontan Dack (Oxford)
Other speakers: Trinity Laban staff and alumni 
Open to Trinity Laban staff and students only.

 

Wed 18 May 2016
Lightening Talks
Faculty of Dance, Research Hub, 16.15-18.15
Trinity Laban staff present research in progress.
Open to Trintiy Laban staff and research students only.

 

Thu 2 June 2016
RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES
Charles Edward McGuire (Oberlin College & Conservatory, Ohio)
Faculty of Dance, Lecture Theatre, 17.15-18.15

London Driven: Celebrity and Spectacle at the British Musical Festival, 1784-1838

The unifying theme of the British musical festival in the years between 1784 and 1838 was the culture of celebrity. As Pippa Drummond, Brian Pritchard and others have noted, festivals during this time shifted from small, local gatherings to national events: they featured star soloists famous throughout Britain and even the European Continent, were discussed in the national press, and required a great deal of time, money, and effort to execute. All elements of the festival were geared towards creating a sense of spectacle, be it the star singers’ lavish salaries, the increasing fragmentation of sacred music programmes to feature excerpts instead of complete works (save, of course, for Handel’s Messiah), and an effort to both contextualise and historicise festivals via publishing lavish, detailed histories immediately after their completion. All of these elements were advantageous to the singer, and all of them stemmed directly from practices disseminated from festivals in London to the provinces.

Between 1784 and 1838, there were significant, if irregular festivals in London. Yet London is not usually a focus point for the study of the British musical festival. This is curious, since London festivals helped define how others in the provinces were organised, programmed, and even considered for the next fifty years. London festivals remained central to the infrastructure and the trends of the British festival in general, and presaged a number of debates about the purpose and place of the festival that would continue for the remainder of the Long Nineteenth Century. At one end, the Commemorations held in Westminster Abbey and the Pantheon between 1784 and 1791 began the vogue for “excerpting” that composers works to suit the growing power of singers’ celebrity – the so-called “Westminster Abbey Selections.” At the other, the festivals of the 1830s, whether given at Westminster Abbey or Exeter Hall, invigorated debates on the propriety of holding festivals in the grand churches of Britain, the place of the composer versus the singer at the festival, and even whether or not the British festival should remain nominally a state religion exercise. Examining contemporary programmes, press reports, and theological tracts reveals that just as London created the festival as celebrity spectacle, it also brought the phenomenon to its close.

Open to the public.

 

13 - 24 June 2016
AHRC Funded Architecture-Dance Project (with Wolfgang Weileder-Newcastle University, Charles Linehan, Jonathan Owen Clark)
At various venues: Canary Wharf (site-specific); Bonnie Bird Theatre (Faculty of Dance); Contextual Seminar (Faculty of Dance)
Open to the public

 

Attendance at events specified as open to the public is free of charge. External visitors are requested to book their place in advance by emailing the Research Administrator, Angela Kerkhoff, a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk.

Please contact the Research Administrator if you have any queries: a.kerkhoff@trinitylaban.ac.uk.

 

Find information on staff/student showcase events in the PARALLAX series here
Find information on Research Professional Development events here

 

Banner image: Artist Jaimie Henthorn, Photographer Rachel Cherry

 

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